Treatise on Energy I

Energy flows one way in nature – from east to west. one must become aligned with the natural flow if one is to become the highest that one, indefinitely, is. Within all humankind there is a natural tendency toward the divine, for being of the divine, we yearn to return from whence we have come. It is a natural truth that, being so hidden and now mostly forgotten, is feared by most who now dwell hither. Ere the coming of the new ages of this world, The Ancient Ones beheld the movement of energy in great awe, but they were not afraid of it and knew that it, the energy, underlying all things was there too for them to make use of. This knowledge and understanding has been lost largely within the spheres of all the cultures of this world. Even to those few to whom this arcanum is now held, they possess not the wisdom of begetting their true forms – of utilising this energy, and many who know not of it or understand it not, must receive the effects of its wrath in accordance with the Foundational Law of Balance.

The Law of Balance dictates that all change in the universe must interact such that it minimises effects – change must, like energy its begetter, flow and meet little or no resistance. It also means that, all things in the universe must change in such away that the totality of the universe’s energy remain balanced. This is why universal changes take a long time to happen, though the effects be great; but man, in haste and in fear for his mortality, delves into immediate use and destroys and cultivates, imbibes and imbues. For every positive that exists, there must be a negative. It is for this reason, that The Ancient Ones, the Great Teachers of the world, taught that balancing energy was more important than doing good things. Doing what is right is more important than doing what is good. Indeed, this is still true even though the terms “right” and “good” have become jumbled and are now regarded as identical in meaning. However, to do what is right, means that when the action is complete, it flows into the direction of the universal energy flow and as such, minimises latent effects in the total energy system of the universe. In other words, doing what is right means that the “Domino Effect” no longer has weighting on the actions or inactions of the universe.

All things in nature mirror this effect – that in change, they naturally flow in the manner of least resistance. This is most easily observed with water, that does not allow obstacles to impede its flow, but gracefully meanders around it or carves a new path – whichever possesses the least resistance. However, the “Domino Effect” accumulates Karmic Energy that would seek to balance all action and inaction in the universe. It is a stringent two-fold rule that alternates in waves creating negative and positive reactions in its wake.

That which is right takes upon itself its own action, like a river flows into the ocean taking with it naught but itself. This flow carries one to the Divine Realm. What is called “good” is defined by man based on what he has learned and on what he has been told, but only that which is right is ordained by God and can carry one to the realisation of Immortality in the Kingdom of the Divine One.

Copyright © 2012 SKLADUM. All rights reserved.

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How to Meditate

STEP 1:

Find a quiet, peaceful place where you can be secluded and undisturbed during meditation. Create your own sanctuary exclusively for your meditation practice.

Sit on a straight chair or cross legged on a firm surface — cover that with a woolen blanket and/or a silk cloth. This insulates your seat from the downward pull of subtle earth currents.

STEP 2:

Erect Spine

One of the first requisites for meditation is correct posture. The spine should be erect. When the devotee is seeking to direct his mind and life force upward through the cerebrospinal axis to the centers of higher consciousness in the brain, he should avoid stricture or pinching of the spinal nerves caused by improper posture.

Sit on a Straight Armless Chair

Those persons whose legs are supple may prefer to meditate sitting cross-legged on a cushion on the floor, or on a firm bed.

However, Paramahansa Yogananda recommended the following meditation pose:

Sit on a straight armless chair with the feet resting flat on the floor. Hold spine erect, abdomen in, chest out, shoulders back, chin parallel to the ground. The hands, with palms upturned, should rest on the legs at the juncture of the thighs and the abdominal region to prevent the body from bending forward.

If the correct posture has been assumed, the body will be stable yet relaxed, so that it is easily possible to remain completely still, without moving a muscle.

Now, close your eyes and gently lift your gaze upward, without straining, to the point between the eyebrows — the seat of concentration, and of the spiritual eye of divine perception.

STEP 3:

1) Prayer

After you are established in the meditation posture, begin by offering God a prayer from your heart, expressing your devotion and asking His blessings on your meditation.

2) Tense and Relax to Remove All Stress

Inhale, tensing the whole body and clenching the fists.
Relax all the body parts at once and, as you do so, expel the breath through the mouth in a double exhalation, “huh, huh.”

Repeat this practice three to six times.

Then forget the breath. Let it flow in and out naturally, of its own accord, as in ordinary breathing.

3) Focus Attention at the Spiritual Eye

With the eyelids half closed (or completely closed, if this is more comfortable to you), look upward, focusing the gaze and the attention as though looking out through a point between the eyebrows. (A person deep in concentration often “knits” his brows at this spot.) Do not cross the eyes or strain them; the upward gaze comes naturally when one is relaxed and calmly concentrated.

What is important is fixing the whole attention at the point between the eyebrows. This is the Christ Consciousness center, the seat of the single eye spoken of by Jesus: “The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light” (Matthew 6:22).

When the purpose of meditation is fulfilled, the devotee finds his consciousness automatically concentrated at the spiritual eye, and he experiences, according to his inner spiritual capacity, a state of joyous divine union with Spirit.

4) Pray Deeply to God in the Language of Your Own Heart

Whether you see the light of the spiritual eye or not, however, you should continue to concentrate at the Christ Consciousness center between the eyebrows, praying deeply to God and His great saints. In the language of your heart invoke Their presence and Their blessings.

Silently chant and pray to God, keeping the attention at the point between the eyebrows, until you feel God’s response as calm, deep peace and inner joy.

Adapted from Paramahansa Yogananda

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